How to Create

a standard HDD (hard disk drive) actually does make a big difference in overall performance. In the majority of the starting configurations for gaming PCs, the standard drive is a 1TB HDD and most customers just leave it as is.

Earlier this year, my brother was looking for a new PC and I made it a point to make sure he gets one with an SSD as the boot drive. He had purchased one with a regular HDD and boot times were slow. He returned that and got one with an SSD. He was extremely happy and was extremely surprised at how fast things booted up and ran. It was like instant-on with the SSD whereas with the HDD, you can go do something else and come back later.

Think about this. The CPU gets updated every single year. Same with the graphics card. Memory is now at DDR4. But, HDD technology hasn’t advanced much in the last decade at the very least. The only advances that pertain to the hard drives is the SATA connection and the last update to that was the introduction of SATA 3.0 back in 2009. Eight years ago!

SATA 3.0 basically increases the speed and bandwidth of the connection between the drives and the system. But if HDD performance hasn’t increased much, having a SATA 3.0 connection really doesn’t matter.

My Recommended Setup

In my own system, I have both SSDs and HDDs. I use a decent size 256GB SSD as my boot drive and a 2.5TB HDD as my data drive.

The cost per gigabyte for SSDs is still roughly 6 times in comparison to the same size HDD drive. So, if you need a large drive for your data, get an HDD as a secondary drive but definitely get an SSD as your primary boot drive.

Actually, I have a total of 4 drives in my main system. I have two SSDs and two HDDs. One SSD is my boot drive. The other SSD is where I keep my files and install my games. The large 2.5TB HDD is my media drive (pictures, videos, etc). My second HDD is my backup drive where I have automatic backups of certain folders from my other drives.

The reason I don’t keep any of my files and whatnot on the boot drive is that I had a tendency to reinstall a fresh copy of windows every couple of years. By keep my files on other drives, I never have to worry about moving or losing my data when I wipe the main drive for a reinstall.

Gaming Performance

Having your games installed on the SSD versus a HDD also makes a big difference when it comes to load times. In my previous articles, I mentioned that the graphics card is the most important when it comes to gaming performance and then the processor after that.

But, don’t you hate waiting for the game to load or for the next region to load when moving around in a large game world? Having the best graphics card won’t help with load times. This is where the drive performance comes into play and the SSD makes a big difference.

SSD / HDD Brands

For HDDs, my go to brand has been and still is Western Digital. I have used many of the other brands over the years and when it comes to performance and especially reliability, Western Digital is still king, in my opinion.

For SSDs, Samsung and Kingston are brands that I like. However, within the last year, Western Digital is finally now offering their own line of SSDs and so far the reviews have been good. I have yet to test one myself but I have faith in Western Digital to put out good products.

Based on my own experience, the Samsung 850 Pro 256GB SSD is a good start and priced decently for an SSD.

NEW YORKSept. 21, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Bersin, Deloitte Consulting LLP’s digital destination for the human resources professional, has found in its latest “High Impact HR” research that new workplace technologies and changing workforce expectations are creating unprecedented opportunities for HR organizations to transform the way companies and their people interact.

“As companies focus on digital business transformation, they are discovering that the need to reskill, engage, and improve the productivity of their people is paramount,” said Josh Bersin, principal and founder, Bersin, Deloitte Consulting LLP. “These pressures, coupled with a shift toward team-centric management and a renewed focus on inclusion and culture, has totally changed the focus of HR.”

Demands of digitally-enabled customers with high expectations are pushing HR leaders to focus on empowerment of the workforce and transformation of the workplace to create an irresistible employee experience. Bersin’s research finds the highest-performing HR organizations surveyed tend to:

  • Focus on a flexible and empowering workplace experience. Leading HR teams are applying design thinking and partnering with their organization’s product, sales and marketing teams to overhaul HR offerings and to create engaging employee experiences. These organizations are more than 5-times more effective at improving employee engagement and retention than their peers.
  • Apply advanced HR technologies to help improve work, not HR processes. High-impact organizations are increasingly experimenting with and applying new digital platforms that can improve productivity, feedback, and alignment among teams, rather than just automating existing processes or creating integrated systems of record with standard HR tools.
  • Shift to understanding and optimizing networks of teams. High–impact HR organizations are redefining their talent practices around teams, instead of around hierarchies. Top organizations are 4.5-times more likely to practice effective teamwork and collaboration when they dedicate an increasing share of resources to building teams and supporting them to help drive business performance.
  • Lead the company’s digital transformation efforts. While companies have struggled to make HR relevant for many years, Bersin’s research shows that high-performing companies use HR to lead the digital transformation of the company. Organizations that use HR in this way are 2.5-times more likely to reach the “high-impact” level in the research.
  • Operate cross-functionally and focused on customer-facing roles. High-impact HR teams now operate across all functions in an integrated way, creating common programs and developing more levels of talent mobility. In Bersin’s research, high-performing HR organizations are 51 percent more integrated across business functions and 43 percent more focused on customer-facing roles.
  • Shape and drive culture. HR leaders who promote and strengthen a culture of trust, inclusion and accountability to empower learning, innovation and performance are 5.1-times more likely to make employees feel connected and valued.
  • Revitalize and develop the HR function. These high-impact HR organizations are heavily focused on internal development and regularly outperform their peers in areas like analytics, artificial intelligence, and data security.

“This research shows a whole different model for HR starting to be implemented around the world,” said Bersin. “These HR organizations are in a leadership and strategic role, they are actively redesigning the organization, they are working directly with customer-facing groups, and they experiment and leverage technology to try to make work life better.”

High-Impact HR organizations are those that have reached the highest levels of maturity (Levels 3 and 4) as classified by the Bersin high-impact methodology. This methodology outlines a progression of capabilities for advancing in HR maturity, defined as demonstrating practices that increasingly drive business- and workforce-related outcomes. Thirty-four percent of organizations in our 2017 High-Impact HR research are identified as high-impact.

About Deloitte
Deloitte provides industry-leading audit, consulting, tax and advisory services to many of the world’s most admired brands, including 80 percent of the Fortune 500 and more than 6,000 private and middle market companies. Our people work across more than 20 industry sectors to deliver measurable and lasting results that help reinforce public trust in our capital markets, inspire clients to make their most challenging business decisions with confidence, and help lead the way toward a stronger economy and a healthy society.

Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee (“DTTL”), its network of member firms, and their related entities. DTTL and each of its member firms are legally separate and independent entities. DTTL (also referred to as “Deloitte Global”) does not provide services to clients. In the United States, Deloitte refers to one or more of the U.S. member firms of DTTL, their related entities that operate using the “Deloitte” name in the United States and their respective affiliates. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting. Please see www.deloitte.com/about to learn more about our global network of member firms.

NEW YORKSept. 21, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Bersin, Deloitte Consulting LLP’s digital destination for the human resources professional, has found in its latest “High Impact HR” research that new workplace technologies and changing workforce expectations are creating unprecedented opportunities for HR organizations to transform the way companies and their people interact.

“As companies focus on digital business transformation, they are discovering that the need to reskill, engage, and improve the productivity of their people is paramount,” said Josh Bersin, principal and founder, Bersin, Deloitte Consulting LLP. “These pressures, coupled with a shift toward team-centric management and a renewed focus on inclusion and culture, has totally changed the focus of HR.”

Demands of digitally-enabled customers with high expectations are pushing HR leaders to focus on empowerment of the workforce and transformation of the workplace to create an irresistible employee experience. Bersin’s research finds the highest-performing HR organizations surveyed tend to:

  • Focus on a flexible and empowering workplace experience. Leading HR teams are applying design thinking and partnering with their organization’s product, sales and marketing teams to overhaul HR offerings and to create engaging employee experiences. These organizations are more than 5-times more effective at improving employee engagement and retention than their peers.
  • Apply advanced HR technologies to help improve work, not HR processes. High-impact organizations are increasingly experimenting with and applying new digital platforms that can improve productivity, feedback, and alignment among teams, rather than just automating existing processes or creating integrated systems of record with standard HR tools.
  • Shift to understanding and optimizing networks of teams. High–impact HR organizations are redefining their talent practices around teams, instead of around hierarchies. Top organizations are 4.5-times more likely to practice effective teamwork and collaboration when they dedicate an increasing share of resources to building teams and supporting them to help drive business performance.
  • Lead the company’s digital transformation efforts. While companies have struggled to make HR relevant for many years, Bersin’s research shows that high-performing companies use HR to lead the digital transformation of the company. Organizations that use HR in this way are 2.5-times more likely to reach the “high-impact” level in the research.
  • Operate cross-functionally and focused on customer-facing roles. High-impact HR teams now operate across all functions in an integrated way, creating common programs and developing more levels of talent mobility. In Bersin’s research, high-performing HR organizations are 51 percent more integrated across business functions and 43 percent more focused on customer-facing roles.
  • Shape and drive culture. HR leaders who promote and strengthen a culture of trust, inclusion and accountability to empower learning, innovation and performance are 5.1-times more likely to make employees feel connected and valued.
  • Revitalize and develop the HR function. These high-impact HR organizations are heavily focused on internal development and regularly outperform their peers in areas like analytics, artificial intelligence, and data security.

“This research shows a whole different model for HR starting to be implemented around the world,” said Bersin. “These HR organizations are in a leadership and strategic role, they are actively redesigning the organization, they are working directly with customer-facing groups, and they experiment and leverage technology to try to make work life better.”

High-Impact HR organizations are those that have reached the highest levels of maturity (Levels 3 and 4) as classified by the Bersin high-impact methodology. This methodology outlines a progression of capabilities for advancing in HR maturity, defined as demonstrating practices that increasingly drive business- and workforce-related outcomes. Thirty-four percent of organizations in our 2017 High-Impact HR research are identified as high-impact.

About Deloitte
Deloitte provides industry-leading audit, consulting, tax and advisory services to many of the world’s most admired brands, including 80 percent of the Fortune 500 and more than 6,000 private and middle market companies. Our people work across more than 20 industry sectors to deliver measurable and lasting results that help reinforce public trust in our capital markets, inspire clients to make their most challenging business decisions with confidence, and help lead the way toward a stronger economy and a healthy society.

Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee (“DTTL”), its network of member firms, and their related entities. DTTL and each of its member firms are legally separate and independent entities. DTTL (also referred to as “Deloitte Global”) does not provide services to clients. In the United States, Deloitte refers to one or more of the U.S. member firms of DTTL, their related entities that operate using the “Deloitte” name in the United States and their respective affiliates. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting. Please see www.deloitte.com/about to learn more about our global network of member firms.

series about social media and well-being

This month, BBC Future is exploring social media’s impact on mental health and well-being – and seeking solutions for a happier, healthier experience on these platforms. Stay tuned for more stories, coming soon…

Share your tips for a happy life on social media with the hashtag #LikeMinded on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Describing yourself as ‘a social media addict’ doesn’t usually inspire concern from other people. In fact, it’s frequently included in bio descriptions on Twitter and Instagram. Decorate your LinkedIn profile with such a claim and you may even find yourself receiving interest from media and publishing companies searching for a savvy digital native. But imagine if, one day, it’s not an accolade or joke at all – but a psychiatrist’s diagnosis?

Social media addiction has been a much-flouted term lately; maybe it’s because it’s January and users are looking to be more active and spend less time online, or maybe that’s because social media can have a negative impact on our mental well-being. But a growing body of research is seriously considering whether problematic and excessive social media usage could be pathological and, in turn, designated as a mental health disorder.

Technological addictions have been found to include the same criteria as chemical addictions, such as smoking and alcoholism (Credit: Getty)

There are two established organisations which classify mental disorders – the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the American Psychiatric Association. Any alleged addiction needs to fit certain criteria before it’s considered pathological behaviour, and there needs to be a vast amount of research that confirms it. It was only announced in January 2018 that video gaming addiction – a problem as old as the internet itself – will be listed by the WHO as a disorder.

What’s especially interesting about this new classification is that one of the experts who has been researching it for decades – Mark Griffiths at Nottingham Trent University – has also been investigating gambling addictions, internet addictions and the excessive, perhaps even dangerous, use of social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Screentime isn’t necessarily an accurate gauge for whether someone is using their favourite platforms problematically

“Do I believe that people can be so engrossed in social media that they neglect everything else in their life?” he asks. “I do think it can be potentially addictive.”

In his research, Griffiths has found that a technological compulsion like ‘social media addiction’ comes with all the behavioural signals that we might usually associate with chemical addictions, such as smoking or alcoholism. These include mood changes,  social withdrawal, conflict and relapse.

The most important factor is whether a person can differentiate between healthy use and a relationship with social media sites that is negatively affecting their life.

“If I take video gaming, for example, I’ve come across a lot of very excessive gamers,” Griffiths explains, “but there’s little known negative, detrimental effects in their life. If they did that for two years then maybe obesity or being generally sedentary might bring on some health issues, but in terms of addiction? Excessive enthusiasms add to life and addictions take away from it.”

So, as long as that enthusiastic playing isn’t affecting an individual’s job or personal relationships, then there is no need for concern. Putting a time limit on social media use is, for Griffiths, “a bit of a red herring. You can have two people doing things identically – it makes a big difference if someone has a job, partner and two children.”

This suggests that screentime isn’t necessarily an accurate gauge for whether someone is using their favourite platforms problematically. When we polled BBC Future’s Twitter followers for what they thought was ‘too much’ time on social media, there was little consensus. Of course, our results were from a self-selecting sample so do not necessarily represent the general population, but they were nonetheless interesting.

BBC Future Twitter Poll (Credit: Sophia Smith Galer)

We polled our Twitter followers to find out what they thought qualified as too much time on social media (Credit: Sophia Smith Galer)

Over a third (40%) of the 554 people who voted thought that more than two or three hours was too much, but we know that most people spend at least two hours social networking and messaging every day. The majority of internet users do not have pathological relationships with social media, which surely means that two or three hours probably isn’t too much at all. We know that over a third of UK 15-year-olds use the internet for six or more hours a day, with much of that time dedicated to social networking sites. Despite their heavy consumption, such heavy use does not mean these young people are mentally unwell. Time spent online is only one factor. There are clearly other things to consider.

So, if it’s not about the amount of time spent, what else might define social media addiction – or help us understand what sort of person might be most vulnerable to it?

Social media addiction is a long way from being designated as a mental disorder

Griffiths and his colleague Daria Kuss published the first ever review paper for what he calls SNS (social networking sites) addiction in 2011, at a time when there were only three papers on the subject. They found that extroverts appear to use these sites for social enhancement, whereas introverts use them for social compensation. They also found that more time spent on these sites involved less involvement with real-life communities. In 2014, in another overview paper, they added that SNS use provides continuous rewards; users may increase engagement with it to relieve dysphoric mood states, sometimes leading to psychological dependency.

Then in 2017 a large, national survey found that those showing addictive behaviours were more likely to be women, young and single. They also tended to have lower levels of education, income and self-esteem.

“The thing about social networking is that it’s a social behaviour. In terms of general sex differences and gender differences, the typical female tends to be more social than the typical male,” says Griffiths.

 

Extroverts appear to use social media for social enhancement, whereas introverts use it for social compensation (Credit: Getty)

For Griffiths, the potential for SNS addiction lies in content and context of excessive use – not the time spent. However, at a conference about social media and mental health at the Royal Society of Medicine, he concluded that the reasons behind such an addiction are still unclear. It could be to do with Fomo, the fear of missing out. Smartphone addiction might also be a part of it, as well as nomophobia – the fear of not having your phone with you at all times. More importantly, the data on SNS research is skewed toward Facebook, little is available about photo-based platforms like Instagram and Snapchat.

This means that social media, or SNS addiction, is a long way from being designated as a mental disorder. Amy Orben, a social media psychologist at the University of Oxford, says that for now, she has strong reservations about defining social media as an addiction. “The evidence is still so scarce it is difficult to even know whether the effect of social media is positive or negative. We need to make sure we don’t overpathologise regular behaviours.”

 Moderate digital technology use is not intrinsically harmful and may be advantageous in a connected world

Whether it is one day classified or not – it is clear that there are downsides to using social media platforms. Research has suggested that young people who spend more than two hours a day on social networking sites are more likely to report poor mental health. If you’re on Instagram, there are examples aplenty of overly-filtered simulations of life that are supposed to be ‘aspirational’ but instead make many users feel like we’re having a worse life than our peers. It’s of little surprise that Instagram was rated as the worst social media platform for young people’s mental health in a UK survey. Yet its audience is growing – there are now over 800 million users worldwide.

We do know there is a direct link between social-media use and depression but other research shows that social media use is not always negative. One 2017 study found that the relationship between digital screen time and mental well-being works in a sort of upside-down u-curve. They call it the Goldilocks Hypothesis: – increasing doses of time on your smartphone or your computer is actually positively associated with well-being, but only to a point. Then, the dose is associated with lower levels of well-being, as the graph below shows.

Credit: Andrew Przybylski

This graph suggests that screen time improves your mental well-being – but only up to a point (Credit: Andrew Przybylski)

The team found that moderate digital technology use “is not intrinsically harmful and may be advantageous in a connected world.” One of its authors, Andrew Przybylski from the University of Oxford, told BBC Future that “if you don’t have any access, or if there’s a no screen policy in a home, there are ways that that home or that childhood might be fundamentally different”.

He added: “There’s a sweet spot where it looks like it’s part of kids’ lives, but it really doesn’t start getting disruptive until you start going to five, six, seven hours a day.”

When it does begin to get disruptive, or someone is online far too much, one solution could come in the form of pop-up warning signs. Griffiths says that they’re currently used by online gambling sites and, more importantly, they’re working.

“The way that we’ve designed these for companies is to make sure that all the messaging is done in a non-judgmental, non-confrontational way. You incorporate normative information to let people know how their behaviour compares with other people – you’ve gambled this much and it’s 10 times what the normal person does. It doesn’t say that’s good or bad.”

Encouraging users to self-appraise in this way could pave the way for a similar move in social media. These social comparisons could help individuals understand whether their use is comparative to their peers. A teen spending hours online during the day might be ok, but if a sign popped up at three in the morning saying “3% of your age group are online right now” you might recognise this as detrimental.

Unfortunately, if social media addiction is ever a recognised disorder – self-appraisal, and the realisation that heavy social media use is affecting us more than we think, might happen too late. Until then, a little self moderation might go a long way.

Follow our #LikeMinded season for tricks and tips to moderate your virtually social, over-shared world.

Join 800,000+ Future fans by liking us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter.

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New research from the University of British Columbia’s (UBC’s) School of Engineering shows that mold is proving to be increasingly important in the arena of engineering materials and can lead to early deterioration and structural failure. This is particularly the case as manufacturers adopt more bio-derived materials in the drive toward a ‘greener future’, according to researcher Bryn Crawford.

A multi-disciplinary team of researchers at UBC’s Okanagan campus from the Composites Research Network and the Department of Biology, working in collaboration with MIT and the National Research Council of Canada, has been studying the development and application of bio-sourced composites—specifically flax and hemp fibers. Both materials are plentiful in Canada and can be mixed with other materials—including a range of thermoplastics—to create cheaper, recyclable, and effective composite material products that are used by a wide range of industries, including transportation.

Read More

Whether you’re a DOE devotee, agnostic or skeptic, you should consider signing up for a special DOE workshop held in advance of next month’s Molding 2018 Conference and Exhibiton Monday Feb. 26. Presented by Suhas Kulkarni, the founder and president of injection molding consultancy Fimmtech, Carlsbad, Calif., and hosted at Comar LLC’s Garden Grove, Calif. facility (acquired from ProPlas Technologies in June of 2017), the four-hour workshop will walk participants through the DOE technique and offer simple steps on how to perform DOEs in injection molding. A well-designed and executed DOE should be a key component of your process development, find out how and why at this special event.

Topics to be Covered in the Workshop Include:

Read More

My profile of Octex Group in Sarasota, Fla., for an On-Site cover story in next month’s issue (sneak preview here) is largely a story about transformation. A company that started out as a commodity custom injection molder of cups, lids, and handles began in 2014 to remake itself into a high-tech supplier to the most demanding customers in medical, aerospace, defense, and automotive industries.

At the same time, it evolved into a business (under $50 million) that’s about much more than molding. A good part of a $10 million program to expand, upgrade, and re-envision the company has gone into building two sister companies to provide world-class moldmaking and metrology services—Choice Tool & Mold and Omnia Scientific, respectively.

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With this blog we launch a series of articles based on 2017 research conducted by market-research firm Mastio & Co., St. Joseph, Mo. on key markets for extruders of polyethylene film. Each weekly blog will consist of growth projections, technology drivers, and key players in each of 10 different film segments. We’ll kick off the series with stretch film.

According to Mastio’ s research, the stretch film market continues to be one of the largest and most rapidly evolving PE film markets. Interview with processors conducted by Mastio reveal that stretch film processors remain optimistic about increases in demand for stretch film products, as stretch film continues to displace other conventional means of pallet unitization and product bundling.

Read More

A press from the early aughts or late 90s is by no stretch outdated, particularly in its machine functions, but in other areas—think controller, connectivity, data collection—it is certainly a step or two behind.

At our manual Molding Conference and Exhibition (Feb. 27-March 1; Hilton Long Beach; Long Beach, Calif.), the primary emphasis is getting the most out of the machines on your shop floor today, regardless of the vintage, but we also traditionally look at where the next generation of presses is headed in our Emerging Technologies track. This year is no different and molders who need (or want to know about) the latest and greatest will not be .

source:https://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=AwrSbDvVO2RapywAlZJXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5bjV2MW44BGNvbG8DZ3ExBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDREZENl8xBHNlYwNwYWdpbmF0aW9u?p=www.tenology+blog&pz=10&ei=utf-8&type=22483_110316&fr=tightropetb&bct=0&b=91&pz=10&bct=0&pstart=20

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